History of Phonology: Learnability

Abstract

This chapter examines the brief but vibrant history of learnability in phonology. We trace the question of learnability back to the foundational crises in mathematics and computer science, through the synthesis of these fields with linguistics, and onward to the foundational problems of language, and phonological, learning. We observe this history is mostly one-sided, with many ideas from learning imported to phonology, but rarely the converse. We finish by discussing several overarching tensions pervading this field, signaling rapid change and many flowering prospects.

Publication
In the Oxford Handbook of the History of Phonology, ed. Elan Dresher and Harry van der Hulst, chapter 32. Oxford University Presss
Jon Rawski
Jon Rawski
Researcher

I am a PhD student working at the interface of mathematics, linguistics, cognitive science, and algorithmic learning theory.

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